45 members of the Congressional Black Caucus are coming to the show tomorrow night and will be at a talk back with the band and Audra after the show. Hey, if all 535 members of Congress came to the show, along with the POTUS and SCOTUS and the President’s cabinet, it wouldn’t be nearly as cool, enlightening, and interesting as talking with Cornel West! I could chat with him for hours! Too bad we only had a few minutes. I love my job! @ladydayonbway @audraequalitymc @georgefarmer

45 members of the Congressional Black Caucus are coming to the show tomorrow night and will be at a talk back with the band and Audra after the show. Hey, if all 535 members of Congress came to the show, along with the POTUS and SCOTUS and the President’s cabinet, it wouldn’t be nearly as cool, enlightening, and interesting as talking with Cornel West! I could chat with him for hours! Too bad we only had a few minutes. I love my job! @ladydayonbway @audraequalitymc @georgefarmer

$1.4M FOR WOMAN INJURED BY PA. FISHBONE STAGE-DIVE

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A woman who broke her skull and collarbone when the lead singer of Fishbone dived from a Philadelphia stage has been awarded $1.4 million in her lawsuit against the band.
A federal judge found that Fishbone’s Angelo “Dr. Madd Vibe” Moore has shown little remorse and hasn’t stopped stage-diving despite frequent injuries to concert-goers.
Kimberly Myers, of Voorhees, N.J., was injured during a performance at WXPN’s World Cafe Live in February 2010. She lost consciousness when she was knocked to the floor, yet the band “continued to perform as if nothing had happened,” U.S. District Judge Jan DuBois wrote in Wednesday’s ruling.
The award, first reported Thursday by The Legal Intelligencer, includes $1.1 million in compensatory damages against Moore and his band and business partner, bassist John Norwood Fisher. Moore was also ordered to pay $250,000 in punitive damages.
Amee Hamlin of Silverback Artist Management, which manages the Los Angeles-based band, said she had no immediate comment on the damage award.
The band has been stage-diving since the 1980s, and had been sued at least once before over a similar injury, the judge said.
"Moore testified that every couple of months an ambulance is called to the concert venue," DuBois wrote.
Moore, in a February 2011 deposition said the band doesn’t issue warnings about the act because it detracts from the show’s “theatrics.”
"People want to be on the edge when they go to a Fishbone show," Moore said, according to the ruling.
Myers, a mother of three, had not known the band was on the schedule when she went to World Cafe Live that night, her lawsuit said. She works in management for a company that conducts pharmaceutical clinical trials, but now suffers from memory problems, shoulder pain, and autoimmune problems that led to lupus, the ruling said.
Myers, now 46, previously settled with other defendants, including the University of Pennsylvania, which operates the music venue.

$1.4M FOR WOMAN INJURED BY PA. FISHBONE STAGE-DIVE

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A woman who broke her skull and collarbone when the lead singer of Fishbone dived from a Philadelphia stage has been awarded $1.4 million in her lawsuit against the band.

A federal judge found that Fishbone’s Angelo “Dr. Madd Vibe” Moore has shown little remorse and hasn’t stopped stage-diving despite frequent injuries to concert-goers.

Kimberly Myers, of Voorhees, N.J., was injured during a performance at WXPN’s World Cafe Live in February 2010. She lost consciousness when she was knocked to the floor, yet the band “continued to perform as if nothing had happened,” U.S. District Judge Jan DuBois wrote in Wednesday’s ruling.

The award, first reported Thursday by The Legal Intelligencer, includes $1.1 million in compensatory damages against Moore and his band and business partner, bassist John Norwood Fisher. Moore was also ordered to pay $250,000 in punitive damages.

Amee Hamlin of Silverback Artist Management, which manages the Los Angeles-based band, said she had no immediate comment on the damage award.

The band has been stage-diving since the 1980s, and had been sued at least once before over a similar injury, the judge said.

"Moore testified that every couple of months an ambulance is called to the concert venue," DuBois wrote.

Moore, in a February 2011 deposition said the band doesn’t issue warnings about the act because it detracts from the show’s “theatrics.”

"People want to be on the edge when they go to a Fishbone show," Moore said, according to the ruling.

Myers, a mother of three, had not known the band was on the schedule when she went to World Cafe Live that night, her lawsuit said. She works in management for a company that conducts pharmaceutical clinical trials, but now suffers from memory problems, shoulder pain, and autoimmune problems that led to lupus, the ruling said.

Myers, now 46, previously settled with other defendants, including the University of Pennsylvania, which operates the music venue.

LEGAL PROBLEMS WITH CO-WRITERS

This article is ©1989 by Kent Klavens, originally appeared as Chapter 3 of his book (now out-of-print) and is reproduced here through his kind courtesy. Mr. Klavens is Sr. VP of Business and Legal Affairs of Universal Music Publishing Group. He was for many years Sr. VP and Gen’l Counsel of Famous Music (a subsidiary of Viacom and affiliate of Paramount Pictures until its sale to Sony/ATV in 2007). 

It’s critically important to understand how your rights to a song are affected when you write with other songwriters, because the majority of hit songs are written by more than one person, and it’s likely that you will have to collaborate with someone at some point in your career. This is a very common area of difficulty and disagreement between songwriters, because most co-writers do not understand their rights and obligations in these situations. It doesn’t matter whether you’ve written a song with your sister, your wife, or your best friend. A lack of knowledge of these issues can cause you a lot of pain later, and if your song becomes a major hit, it may also cost you a lot of money.

Co-Writer Situations

To realize how easy it is to misunderstand the legal rights of collaborators, let’s look at some hypothetical situations. Imagine that you finally get together with a songwriter you’ve been wanting to work with. You bounce a few ideas back and forth. Impressed with each other, you decide to write a few songs. You record simple piano-vocal demos of the songs on a portable cassette recorder. Over the next few months, these problems arise:

1. For the first song, you wrote all of the music and one-half of the lyrics. The two of you decide to license the song for a motion picture for a $1,000 synchronization fee. Do you automatically get $750?

2. For the second song, you wrote only the music, and your collaborator wrote only the lyrics. After promoting the song for a few months to music publishers, producers, and recording artists, all of the criticism is the same – your music is wonderful, but your collaborator’s lyrics are terrible. You decide to find another lyricist to rewrite all of the lyrics without your original collaborator’s approval. Can you create a new song with your music and another songwriter’s lyrics without owing the original lyricist any of the money earned from the new song?

3. The third song you wrote together is perfect for a demo tape featuring you and your band. After promoting this tape for a few months, you get interest from two major record companies that want to sign your group. Both labels insist that the co-written song is by far your biggest potential hit and will be the first single they will release after you’re signed. Your collaborator, who is not in your group and who desperately needs money to pay the rent, finds an advertising agency willing to pay $10,000 because they think the song is perfect for a national advertising campaign for a deodorant spray they represent. You tell the record companies about your collaborator’s plans, and they insist they will not sign your group if the song is used in the commercial. Can you prevent your collaborator from giving a license to the advertising agency, or can you otherwise stop the agency from using the song?

4. Your diligent promotional efforts for the fourth song have paid off, and you finally receive the call you’ve been waiting for. Sally Superstar’s producer loves the song and wants to put it on her next album. Your timing was perfect because every other song on the album is finished and the producer was waiting for a “killer ballad” like yours to finish the project. The record company wants to release the album soon, so Sally and her producer, Eddie Ears, need to begin recording the song within the next five days. Eddie, like many record producers who like to own rights to songs, insists that you assign all of the music publishing rights in your song to his company as a condition of having it recorded on Sally’s album. Your collaborator is camping somewhere in Montana and can’t be reached. Can you assign all music publishing rights in the song to the producer?

Unfortunately for you, and surprising as it may seem, the answer to all of the questions above is “No!” Now you can understand why the legal effects of collaboration are some of the most misunderstood aspects of the business of songwriting. Hopefully, this chapter will clear up some of the confusion.

How Is A Joint Work Created?

joint work under the Copyright Law, is a “work prepared by two or more authors with the intention that their contributions be merged into inseparable or interdependent parts of a unitary whole.” As I discussed in chapter one, a song is subject to copyright protection when “fixed in any tangible medium of expression…from which [it] can be perceived, reproduced or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device.”

Read more HERE: http://wp.wixenmusic.com/publishing-101/legal-problems-with-co-writers/

One of punk rock’s most mercurial frontmen, Bad Brains’ HR has built a reputation on his seemingly limitless energy—and erratic behavior. Now in progress, the locally produced documentary Finding Joseph Iwhich exceeded its $38,000 Kickstarter goal this week—is one of two new films that explores the complicated relationship between HR and his bandmates. Washington City Paperspoke over email with Dawne Langford, the producer/editor of Finding Joseph I, about HR, Bad Brains, and what drew her to the project.

Washington City Paper: What led you to make a documentary about HR?

Dawne Langford: This documentary was started when James Lathos met with HR to interview him for a skate magazine in a Baltimore warehouse he was living in, and the idea came about between the two of them because HR found his questions to be thoughtful and interesting. James has a genuine friendship with him, which I find important. I joined about a year later. Not only was the music that HR created pivotal in my life when I was younger, but I always sensed he was misunderstood and subject to judgment for his impulsive behavior in the past. There are many stories of him out there but rarely do we hear his account.

WCP: Are you familiar with the forthcoming documentary Bad Brains: A Band in DC? I attended a screening at AFI Silver last year. How does your film take a similar or different approach to discussing HR’s legacy?

DL: I personally have only seen excerpts from A Band in DC. The documentary we are working on focuses primarily on HR. This is a living document about his life and music today. The issues we explore have more to do with isolation, renewal, and love, with the understanding that sometimes he did not have full agency in his situation. The focus of this documentary is to share his personal story with the hope it will touch others.

WCP: What is your sense about HR’s commitment to Bad Brains? His behavior at recent shows has been erratic, often seeming disengaged or uninterested. A Band in DC portrays his commitment to performing as something of a liability.

DL: What I can speak to in regards to HR’s commitment to Bad Brains is that he is committed enough to still play with them even though he isn’t always feeling well or even [has] full agency. He doesn’t have any ownership and lives a very humble life (to put it mildly). This music is from 30 years ago. HR has for a very long time been more interested in spirituality through Rastafarianism and focusing on reggae.

For clarification, I am saying HR doesn’t always have full agency over his own moods or behavior in general. Some issues we explore in the documentary are his quest for spiritual peace, the speculation about his mental health, the blurring of lines between performance and everyday life, and all of the expectations he has to live up to. Due to the fact that events are still unfolding, there are some issues I am not able to elaborate on at this time.

WCP: Your Kickstarter campaign description states the following: “HR’s increasingly strange and abnormal behavior has left many convinced that he his suffering from psychological troubles while others believe he is still living out his journey as one of the greatest frontmen in rock and roll history.” You likely spent a great deal of time with HR throughout this process. Do you believe his behavior indicates the presence of a serious mental illness?

DL: Well… I don’t think it is my place to diagnose anyone. What I can say is that sometimes what HR is doing is because he is a creative person, and other times there is a disconnect.

WCP: If the impetus of the film is to tell HR’s story from his perspective, what will the audience will be most surprised by?

DL: There is no intention with this movie to be a counterpoint to A Band in DC or to shock. This is about showing HR as a human being.

http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/artsdesk/music/2013/06/07/dawne-langford-preps-a-new-documentary-about-bad-brains-hr-finding-joseph-i/